Hemingway vs. Joyce / 'Just Representations of Nature'

A 5 page paper examining Samuel Johnson's opinion that no literature will endure the test of time except that which reveals and explores situations and characteristics that are recognizable, that most of us share, and that are common to people across the boundaries of time and space. The paper compares Ernest Hemingway's 'A Clean, Well-Lighted Place' and James Joyce's 'Araby' in view of Johnson's dictum, arguing that Hemingway's story fulfills the requirement better than Joyce's because its theme is more easily accessible to the general reader. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

A Clean Well-Lighted Place by Hemingway

A 4 page paper which examines the short story A Clean Well-Lighted Place by Ernest Hemingway and examines how the story relates to Hemingway and his life. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Loneliness and Hemingway

This 4 page essay examines Ernest Hemingway’s short story “A Clean Well-Lighted Place” and argues that it conveys the feelings of loneliness perfectly. Bibliography lists 1 source.

HEMINGWAY, LOCATION AND SYMBOLISM

This 3-page paper focuses on the importance of location in several of Ernest Hemingway's short stories. Stories discussed include "In a Clean, Well-Lighted Place," The Snows of Kilimonjaro" and "The Killers." Bibligraphy lists 4 sources.

Ernest Hemingway / The Man and His Work

In 5 pages, the author discusses Ernest Hemingway, including biographical information, a discussion and analysis of the author's subject matter, what specific traits and literary techniques are evident in the author's work, and what themes are developed in a typical piece by this author. Also included are a discussion and an analysis of 'Hills Life White Elephants' and ' A Clean, Well Lighted Place,' which are specific literary selections typical of the author's work. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Ernest Hemingway's Short Stories / Modernism, Postmodernism, & The Search For Meaning

An 8 page paper looking at stories by Ernest Hemingway ('A Clean Well-Lighted Place' and 'Snows of Kilimanjaro') and Donald Barthelme ('A Shower of Gold') to show how the transition of literature from modernism to postmodernism mirrors the increasing uncertainty of contemporary life. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

CAMUS, HEMINGWAY AND INDIVIDUALITY

This paper compares existential theories outlined in Ernest Hemingway's "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" and Albert Camus' "The Guest." The essay notes that, although the styles of the writers are different, their treatment of individuals in relation to their world are very similiar. Bibliogrpahy lists 2 sources.

Hemingway: "Hills Like White elephants" and "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place"

A 5 page paper which compares the two stories "Hills Like White Elephants" and "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place," both written by Ernest Hemingway. Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

Hemingway Short Stories

A 10 page paper which examines elements in three of Ernest Hemingway’s short stories. The stories are “Indian Camp,” “Soldier’s Home,” and “A Clean Well-Lighted Place.” Bibliography lists 3 additional sources.

Ernest Hemingway's Own Life Reflected In His Short Stories

An 8 page paper looking at three of Hemingway's short stories -- 'Soldier's Home,' 'A Cat in the Rain,' and 'A Clean, Well-Lighted Place' -- in terms of their relationship to events and experiences in Hemingway's own life. The writer concludes that his stories from World War I on reflect a deepening despair, and a conviction that life ultimately was without meaning. Bibliography lists two sources.

Hemingway's Own Life Reflected In His Short Stories #2

A 9 page paper looking at three of Hemingway's short stories -- 'Soldier's Home,' 'A Cat in the Rain,' and 'A Clean, Well-Lighted Place' -- in terms of their relationship to events and experiences in Hemingway's own life. The paper concludes that his stories from World War I on reflect a deepening despair, and a conviction that life ultimately was without meaning. Bibliography lists two sources.

Hemingway's Life as Depicted in his Stories

An 8 page analysis of how three of Hemingway's stories -- 'Soldier's Home', 'A Cat in the Rain,' and 'A Clean, Well-Lighted Place' not only reflect experiences in Hemingway's own life, but reflect the deepening despair over the meaninglessness of life which resulted from his experiences in World War I. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

Hemingway's Short Stories

5 pages in length. Three of Hemingway's short stories are compared: A Clean Well-Lighted Place; Indian Camp; and Soldier's Home. Common themes are discussed with examples. Hemingway has demonstrated how values clash in each of the stories and what despair does to humankind. Bibliography lists 4 references.

Ernest Hemingway -- Americans as Nonconformists in “A Man of the World” and “Hills Like White Elephants”

This 5 page report discusses two of Ernest Hemingway’s short stories in terms of how they serve as an example of an American as a rebel rather than a conformist. The writing produced by Ernest Hemingway was in itself an act of rebellion that personifies the unique character of how Americans want or believe they should be perceived -- brash, self-sufficient, able to move beyond what most people would presumably consider personal setbacks, even the ability to detach one’s self from personal tragedy and see it in a humorous light. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Ernest Hemingway's 'A Clean, Well-Lighted Place': Ambiguity

5 pages in length. There has been a longstanding dispute among critics that argues the reasons behind incorporating such obvious ambiguity in Ernest Hemingway's 'A Clean, Well-Lighted Place,' attempting to discern whether or not the author did so purposely. Crafty in style and approach, it has been surmised that Hemingway actually intended to incorporate a considerable amount of ambiguity into the story of old age as a means by which to throw off his audience. The aspect in particular that has come under fire is the point at which the two waiters are exchanging dialogue, which, after some investigation, the writer discusses it has become apparent that Hemingway fully intended to create such ambiguity as a way to bring even more notoriety to the piece. Bibliography lists 4 sources.