Radical Innocence: Rebel Depiction

This 7 page paper argues that in Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, the protagonist's character includes aspects that deny him the status of hero, but allow him the stature associated with martyrdom. In both Ellison's Invisible Man and Faulkner's Light In August, the social limitations (and brutalities) of race form the basis for the protagonist's journey to an acceptance of self over the acceptance of society. These three stories are analyzed in terms of Ihab Hassan's book, Radical Innocence. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

Maintaining Identity in Modern Literature

A 5 page essay that analyzes Wallace Stevens' The Idea of Order at Key West; Ernest Hemingway's The Snows of Kilmanjaro; Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man; and T.S. Eliot's The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock in regards to how these works demonstrates the overwhelming sense of loss that modernism engendered in many writers of artistic temperament in the first half of the twentieth century. No additional sources cited.

The Decline of Morality and Social Corruption in America

The Decline of Morality and Social Corruption in America: This 6 page paper assesses the decline in the morality of the American populous as represented in a number of works of literature, and considers the link between the shaping of national or cultural ideals and the dissolution of those ideals in the midst of social turmoil. This paper suggests that the deterioration of the family and of community values is central to moral corruption, and integrates the views of Ralph Ellison, Ernest Hemingway, Nathaniel West, Eudora Welty, E. E. Cummings and William Falkner. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

American Literature: Men and Women

A 3 page paper which examines how two authors of American literature portray men and women. The authors examined are Ernest Hemingway and Kate Chopin. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Growing Up: Three Short Stories

A 3 page paper which examines the theme of growing up, or maturing, as seen in three short stories. The short stories are “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin, “Hills Like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway, and “A & P” by John Updike. No sources cited.

Gender Characterization

To say that gender roles are merely the subjugation of women as 'irrational' would not be true. However, oftentimes women are depicted in literature as irrational and powerless. This 5 page paper explores the characterization of Desiree in Kate Chopin's story of Desiree's Baby; for the grandmother in Flannery O'Connor's A Good Man Is Hard To Find and the woman, Jig, in Hemingway's Hills Like White Elephants in terms of these factors. No additional sources are listed.

Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms

A 5 page essay that offers a case study on author Ernest Hemingway, focusing on A Farewell to Arms as being exemplary of Hemingway's work. The writer discusses the Hemingway style; the plot, mood, etc. of A Farewell to Arms; and also a short evaluation of the influence of Hemingway's fiction on the writers that came after him. No additional sources cited.

Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms, the Hemingway Hero

A 5 page research paper that examines Hemingway's characterization of Frederic Henry as a "Hemingway hero." The writer argues that Frederic personifies Hemingway's concept of heroism and also relates this to Hemingway's era. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Hemingway and War

A 5 page research paper that examines how Hemingway's own war experiences affected his novels A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and Across the River and into the Trees. The writer argues that the first two books reflect Hemingway's experience in the Spanish Civil War and World War I, but that the WWII novel is derived solely from research and not from Hemingway's personal war experience. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”: This 5-page essay discusses the significance and symbolism of the leopard and the hyena in this Hemingway classic. Adept in the use of symbolism, Hemingway not only impelled readers to think, but also was able to leave us with a myriad of introspective questions relevant to the melancholia of unfulfilled dreams. Bibliography lists 1 source. SNHemkil.doc

Hemingway: Differing Treatment Of Men And Women

6 pages in length. Ernest Hemingway was as simple as he was complex. The lucid and uncomplicated images he created with his seemingly elementary style were anything but; in fact, the complexity that resides within his characteristically eloquent prose, which demonstrate a purity and precision like no other, are known only to those who can see beyond their façade. Attention to outer detail and an unquenchable desire to portray his inner pain, Hemingway favored a more simplistic approach to convey his view of women, portraying obvious empathy for his female characters, while his male characters and protagonists appear to be more self absorbed. In viewing the male/female relationships, as well as how men and women are depicted in Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants," "Up in Michigan" and "A Canary for One," the writer discusses how this says a great deal about Hemingway's own perception of women. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Hemingway's "Big Two-Hearted River"

3 pages in length. Considered the most autobiographical of all his works, Hemingway's Big Two-Hearted River reflects upon the writer's never-ending quest to obtain spiritual peace amid an otherwise chaotic world. The absence of organized religion in his life notwithstanding, this spiritual expedition was always fulfilled when Hemingway was surrounded by nature, particularly deep see fishing, two of the primary literary components presented throughout the story. Hemingway's perpetual journey toward the neutralizing elements of 'getting back to nature' is mirrored in the values and actions of Nick Adams, the writer's protagonist whose validity of this search is manifested in such seemingly innocuous realities as settling in to "his home where he had made it" (Hemingway 29). Bibliography lists 5 sources.

The Feminine Sex: Hemingway's Turning of the Tables in "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber"

In "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber" it is obvious Hemingway was trying to understand the characteristics of being female. This 8 page argumentative notes how Hemingway often put his male characters within his own concepts of the feminine as a means of understanding them. He also put females in male roles, as in this story. The argument looks at binaries and growth out of them. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Ernest Hemingway and the Impact of War on the Human Psyche

This 5 page report discusses Ernest Hemingway’s writing that is directly related to his experiences and observations of war and how it has an impact on the psyche of the individual human being. For Hemingway, war serves as a constant in his literary focus and allows for his readers to consider the realities of war in the context in which he wants them to see it rather than in terms of political or even personal points of view. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Symbolism in Hemingway’s “A Farewell to Arms”

A six page paper showing the importance of symbolic content to the understanding of this 1927 novel by Ernest Hemingway. The paper argues that Hemingway’s use of symbolism underscores his belief that life ultimately has no meaning except for the stoicism created by the hero from inside himself. No additional sources.