Easier to Move: Confrontations in 'Bartleby' and 'Soldier's Home'

a 5 page paper comparing Harold Krebs in Hemingway's 'Soldier's Home' with the narrator of 'Bartleby the Scrivener' by Herman Melville. The paper concludes that both these characters have a difficult time risking confrontation, and, despite the fact that one character is a soldier returned from the front and the other a successful lawyer, neither is secure enough to risk a confrontation that could be uncomfortable, painful, or guilt-inducing. Bibliography lists the two primary sources.

Joyce & Hemingway on Leaving Home

A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares the protagonists from Joyce's "Eveline' and Hemingway's "A Soldier's Home." The writer argues that each of these stories has similar themes, but that the emphasis in Joyce's story is on fear of change and this is why the protagonist fails to leave home as in Hemingway's story. No additional sources cited.

Hemingway's Soldier's Home, A Reflection of the Era

A 6 page essay that discusses Hemingway's "Soldier's Home" and how it reflected the era. America's youth trooped off to World War I, wide-eyed and innocent, boys from small towns with high ideals and a concept of war as noble and worthwhile. They returned disillusioned and scarred, not only in their bodies, but also in their minds. This alienation was widespread and prevalent throughout the 1920s, which is the era in which Ernest Hemingway wrote the poignant short story "Soldier's Home." This narrative perfectly reflects this era, as it addresses a young veteran who finds that he has no common ground with the people he left behind in his small town and that the gulf of experience between them is too vast to be breached. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Disconnection in Hemingway and O’Brien

This is a 7 page paper that provides an overview of Hemingway's "Soldier's Home" and O'Brien's "How to Tell a True War Story". The emphasis is on the use of narrative devices to show the dehumanizing effects of war. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Ernest Hemingway's 'Soldier's Home' / Critical Analysis

A 4 page exposition of Hemingway's short story, looking at the background of the protagonist, a soldier just home from the war, before and during the war. Special attention is paid to how Krebs' activities before the story opens affect the story's development and outcome. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Hemingway's Short Stories

5 pages in length. Three of Hemingway's short stories are compared: A Clean Well-Lighted Place; Indian Camp; and Soldier's Home. Common themes are discussed with examples. Hemingway has demonstrated how values clash in each of the stories and what despair does to humankind. Bibliography lists 4 references.

Inner Conflict In Hemingway's Soldier's Home

This 6 page paper posits that Hemingway presents the character of Harold Kreb in Soldier's Home as a man in conflict. He is torn between what he feels is right and what he believes others either expect of him or how they perceive his actions. This internal and external opposition makes for the central theme of the story and is portrayed throughout in a number of different ways. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Hemingway's Short Stories

This 5 page paper explores Hemingway's theory of the tip of the iceberg in five short stories, focusing on Soldier's Home. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Hemingway/Young Women as Objects

A 6 page research paper that examines "Indian Camp" and "Soldier's Home" and argues that Hemingway objectified young women in his fiction. In general, the writer argues that Hemingway did not present females as fully realized characters, but rather focused on the effect that they had on his young male protagonist. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Hemingway/Young Women as Objects

A 6 page research paper that examines "Indian Camp" and "Soldier's Home" and argues that Hemingway objectified young women in his fiction. In general, the writer argues that Hemingway did not present females as fully realized characters, but rather focused on the effect that they had on his young male protagonist. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

HEMINGWAY AND HIS WOMEN

This 6 page paper deals with the topic of Hemingway and his depiction of women in his stories. Opposing commentary is given for why this may have occurred. Two of Hemingway's short stories are analyzed for this female portrayal: Indian Camp and A Soldier's Home. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Hemingway Short Stories

A 10 page paper which examines elements in three of Ernest Hemingway’s short stories. The stories are “Indian Camp,” “Soldier’s Home,” and “A Clean Well-Lighted Place.” Bibliography lists 3 additional sources.

Faulkner and Hemingway

A 5 page paper which examines Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner. The stories examined are Hemingway’s “Soldier’s Home” and Faulkner’s “Barn Burning.” Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Hemingway/"Soldier's Home"

A 3 page research paper/essay that analyzes how Harold Krebs, Hemingway's protagonist in "Soldier's Home," fits the criteria for being an anti-hero. The writer analyzes Hemingway's characterization of Krebs, arguing that he is an anti-hero. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Hemingway’s Short Stories: The Changing Role of the Female

A 15 page paper comparing and contrasting the role of women in the first two collections of Hemingway’s short stories, In Our Time and Men Without Women. Stories covered include “Soldier’s Home,” “The End of Something,” “Cat in the Rain,” “Hills Like White Elephants,” “Che Ti Dice La Patria?,” and “A Canary For One.” Bibliography lists 9 sources.