Symbolism in Hemingway’s “A Farewell to Arms”

A six page paper showing the importance of symbolic content to the understanding of this 1927 novel by Ernest Hemingway. The paper argues that Hemingway’s use of symbolism underscores his belief that life ultimately has no meaning except for the stoicism created by the hero from inside himself. No additional sources.

Ernest Hemingway's Own Life Reflected In His Work

This 7 page paper explores the life and work of author Ernest Hemingway, and how his art was a direct result of his life. Hemingway's narrative style, character structure and common themes are also examined.

Ernest Hemingway / A Life On Paper

A 7 page paper discussing the relationship of the events and people of Ernest Hemingway's life to the characters and plots in his fiction. Three novels are discussed, and numerous correspondences pointed out. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Ernest Hemingway -- Americans as Nonconformists in “A Man of the World” and “Hills Like White Elephants”

This 5 page report discusses two of Ernest Hemingway’s short stories in terms of how they serve as an example of an American as a rebel rather than a conformist. The writing produced by Ernest Hemingway was in itself an act of rebellion that personifies the unique character of how Americans want or believe they should be perceived -- brash, self-sufficient, able to move beyond what most people would presumably consider personal setbacks, even the ability to detach one’s self from personal tragedy and see it in a humorous light. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms

A 5 page essay that offers a case study on author Ernest Hemingway, focusing on A Farewell to Arms as being exemplary of Hemingway's work. The writer discusses the Hemingway style; the plot, mood, etc. of A Farewell to Arms; and also a short evaluation of the influence of Hemingway's fiction on the writers that came after him. No additional sources cited.

THE GREAT OUTDOORS IN HEMINGWAY’S WORKS

This paper examines the impact of Ernest Hemingway's "outdoor" life as hunter and fishermen on his classic stories. Throughout the paper, reference is made to Hemingway's ability to pit man against nature. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants”

An 11 page analysis of this short story by Ernest Hemingway. The paper shows how Hemingway’s distress over his first wife’s pregnancy and the constraints it put on his life is reflected -- but not entirely resolved -- in this fictional work. Two-page annotated bibliography lists ten sources.

A Clean Well-Lighted Place by Hemingway

A 4 page paper which examines the short story A Clean Well-Lighted Place by Ernest Hemingway and examines how the story relates to Hemingway and his life. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”: This 5-page essay discusses the significance and symbolism of the leopard and the hyena in this Hemingway classic. Adept in the use of symbolism, Hemingway not only impelled readers to think, but also was able to leave us with a myriad of introspective questions relevant to the melancholia of unfulfilled dreams. Bibliography lists 1 source. SNHemkil.doc

O'Neill, Hemingway and Stevens On Money and Meaning

A 5 page analysis of how three great writers each address some of the basic questions in life. The writer looks at Wallace Stevens' poem "Sunday Morning," Ernest Hemingway's "The Snows of Kilimanjaro," and Eugene O'Neill's "Long Day's Journey into Night" as to what these great writers say about money and spiritual well being. No additional sources cited.

Self Realization in Three War Novels

A 6 page paper which discusses the quest for a deeper sense of self as depicted in three novels: Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell To Arms, Timothy Findley's The Wars, and Joy Kogawa's Obasan. The paper observes that while a major life crisis is not necessary in order to spur on this important personal journey, it is nonetheless true that most of us go through life without doing any particular self analysis until a crisis strikes -- and then self analysis becomes necessary for psychic survival. Bibliography lists three sources.

Ernest Hemingway and the Impact of War on the Human Psyche

This 5 page report discusses Ernest Hemingway’s writing that is directly related to his experiences and observations of war and how it has an impact on the psyche of the individual human being. For Hemingway, war serves as a constant in his literary focus and allows for his readers to consider the realities of war in the context in which he wants them to see it rather than in terms of political or even personal points of view. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Gender Conflict in Thurber and Hemingway

A five page look at the way tension between the sexes is depicted in James Thurber's two stories "The Catbird Seat" and "The Unicorn in the Garden", as well as in Ernest Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants." The paper suggests that Thurber tends to subvert traditional stereotypes about men and women, while Hemingway tends to support them. No additional sources.

Ernest Hemingway and “Hills Like White Elephants” -- An Example of a Literary Iceberg Beneath the Surface

This 5 page report discusses Ernest Hemingway’s short stories and the ways in which he presents only the “tip of the iceberg” and the impact of the story lies beneath the surface, left to the imagination of the reader. It seems remarkably clear that Hemingway was determined, in virtually all of his writing, to demonstrate an alternative way of thinking that reflected his own alternative attitudes regarding the status quo. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

The Controversial Ernest Hemingway

A five page paper showing why Ernest Hemingway has become controversial in the past few years. The paper concludes that Hemingway's lack of sensitivity toward his female characters is the primary factor making his work controversial, but he represented a similar lack of respect in the society of his era. Bibliography lists three sources.