Symbolism in Hemingway’s “A Farewell to Arms”

A six page paper showing the importance of symbolic content to the understanding of this 1927 novel by Ernest Hemingway. The paper argues that Hemingway’s use of symbolism underscores his belief that life ultimately has no meaning except for the stoicism created by the hero from inside himself. No additional sources.

Ernest Hemingway - The Fascinating Hero

An 8 page paper discussing the life and works of Ernest Hemingway. He was a man who was fascinated by stories of heroes and quite likely envisioned himself, in his purest form, as a hero. While Hemingway did not actually perform any truly heroic acts he perhaps wish he had. He was essentially driven to brink of madness, much like many artists, and committed suicide late in his life. He was known to be a depressed individual on occasion and perhaps it was the fact that life as an old man with no more chances at adventure or heroism caused him to immerse himself in a depression that led to his death. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Ernest Hemingway -- Americans as Nonconformists in “A Man of the World” and “Hills Like White Elephants”

This 5 page report discusses two of Ernest Hemingway’s short stories in terms of how they serve as an example of an American as a rebel rather than a conformist. The writing produced by Ernest Hemingway was in itself an act of rebellion that personifies the unique character of how Americans want or believe they should be perceived -- brash, self-sufficient, able to move beyond what most people would presumably consider personal setbacks, even the ability to detach one’s self from personal tragedy and see it in a humorous light. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms

A 5 page essay that offers a case study on author Ernest Hemingway, focusing on A Farewell to Arms as being exemplary of Hemingway's work. The writer discusses the Hemingway style; the plot, mood, etc. of A Farewell to Arms; and also a short evaluation of the influence of Hemingway's fiction on the writers that came after him. No additional sources cited.

THE BASIS FOR HEMINGWAY’S CODE HERO

This 10 page paper discusses Ernest Hemingway and his development of the 'Code Hero'. Examples from his own life which potentially influenced this evolution are offered as well as examples from Hills Like White Elephants'. Quotes cited from text. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms, the Hemingway Hero

A 5 page research paper that examines Hemingway's characterization of Frederic Henry as a "Hemingway hero." The writer argues that Frederic personifies Hemingway's concept of heroism and also relates this to Hemingway's era. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”: This 5-page essay discusses the significance and symbolism of the leopard and the hyena in this Hemingway classic. Adept in the use of symbolism, Hemingway not only impelled readers to think, but also was able to leave us with a myriad of introspective questions relevant to the melancholia of unfulfilled dreams. Bibliography lists 1 source. SNHemkil.doc

Hemingway/"Soldier's Home"

A 3 page research paper/essay that analyzes how Harold Krebs, Hemingway's protagonist in "Soldier's Home," fits the criteria for being an anti-hero. The writer analyzes Hemingway's characterization of Krebs, arguing that he is an anti-hero. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Hemingway's Heroes / 'A Farewell To Arms' vs. 'For Whom the Bell Tolls'

An 8 page paper discussing the figure of the Hemingway Code Hero -- the stock figure he invented as the personification of the perfect man -- in both Frederick Henry and Robert Jordan. The paper concludes that even though these characters are very different, in their different aspects as seeker and finder, they are both representations of the Hemingway Code Hero. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Faulkner and Hemingway

A 5 page paper which examines Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner. The stories examined are Hemingway’s “Soldier’s Home” and Faulkner’s “Barn Burning.” Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Hemingway vs. Joyce / 'Just Representations of Nature'

A 5 page paper examining Samuel Johnson's opinion that no literature will endure the test of time except that which reveals and explores situations and characteristics that are recognizable, that most of us share, and that are common to people across the boundaries of time and space. The paper compares Ernest Hemingway's 'A Clean, Well-Lighted Place' and James Joyce's 'Araby' in view of Johnson's dictum, arguing that Hemingway's story fulfills the requirement better than Joyce's because its theme is more easily accessible to the general reader. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants”

An 11 page analysis of this short story by Ernest Hemingway. The paper shows how Hemingway’s distress over his first wife’s pregnancy and the constraints it put on his life is reflected -- but not entirely resolved -- in this fictional work. Two-page annotated bibliography lists ten sources.

Subliminal Religion in James’ “American” and Hemingway’s “Sun Also Rises”

A six page paper looking at the way Henry James’ novel “The American” and Ernest Hemingway’s novel “The Sun Also Rises” could be said to be subliminally religious. The paper argues that just as James’ protagonist proves the immorality of the British class system, Hemingway’s protagonist searches for a code of conduct beyond the mores of middle America. No additional sources.

Hemingway: His Stories and His Style

5 pages. This concise paper on Ernest Hemingway describes some of his stories as well as his writing style. Hemingway's use of implied, subtle themes allows readers latitude of interpretation. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

THE GREAT OUTDOORS IN HEMINGWAY’S WORKS

This paper examines the impact of Ernest Hemingway's "outdoor" life as hunter and fishermen on his classic stories. Throughout the paper, reference is made to Hemingway's ability to pit man against nature. Bibliography lists 5 sources.