Hills Like White Elephants: An Analysis of Symbolism in Hemingway’s Short Story

A 4 page overview of the symbolism utilized in this short story. Ernest Hemingway is noted for his use of rich symbolism in much of his work. “Hills Like White Elephants” is particularly exemplary in this regard. Hemingway weaves together element of nature and those made by man to present a story which is rich in deep meaning, meaning replete with human emotion, controversy, and moral breaches. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms

A 5 page essay that offers a case study on author Ernest Hemingway, focusing on A Farewell to Arms as being exemplary of Hemingway's work. The writer discusses the Hemingway style; the plot, mood, etc. of A Farewell to Arms; and also a short evaluation of the influence of Hemingway's fiction on the writers that came after him. No additional sources cited.

Hemingway/Meanings of Masculinity

A 10 page research paper that examine three stories by Ernest Hemingway in regards to his concept of masculinity. The stories are "The End of Something," "The Three-Day Blow," and "Cross-Country Snow." The writer argues against the conventional interpretation of these stories, which sees Hemingway as misogynist. Instead, the writer sees these stories as presenting a "coming of age" for a young man that shows how the protagonist is both attracted to and rebelled by the traditional gender role for men. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

THE GREAT OUTDOORS IN HEMINGWAY’S WORKS

This paper examines the impact of Ernest Hemingway's "outdoor" life as hunter and fishermen on his classic stories. Throughout the paper, reference is made to Hemingway's ability to pit man against nature. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Gender Conflict in Thurber and Hemingway

A five page look at the way tension between the sexes is depicted in James Thurber's two stories "The Catbird Seat" and "The Unicorn in the Garden", as well as in Ernest Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants." The paper suggests that Thurber tends to subvert traditional stereotypes about men and women, while Hemingway tends to support them. No additional sources.

Maintaining Identity in Modern Literature

A 5 page essay that analyzes Wallace Stevens' The Idea of Order at Key West; Ernest Hemingway's The Snows of Kilmanjaro; Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man; and T.S. Eliot's The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock in regards to how these works demonstrates the overwhelming sense of loss that modernism engendered in many writers of artistic temperament in the first half of the twentieth century. No additional sources cited.

“Men Without Women” by Hemingway

A 4 page paper which examines elements in the short stories that are found in Ernest Hemingway’s work “Men Without Women.” No additional sources cited.

Hemingway's Men and Women

This 11 page paper discusses the way men and women are portrayed in the works of Ernest Hemingway. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Ernest Hemingway -- Americans as Nonconformists in “A Man of the World” and “Hills Like White Elephants”

This 5 page report discusses two of Ernest Hemingway’s short stories in terms of how they serve as an example of an American as a rebel rather than a conformist. The writing produced by Ernest Hemingway was in itself an act of rebellion that personifies the unique character of how Americans want or believe they should be perceived -- brash, self-sufficient, able to move beyond what most people would presumably consider personal setbacks, even the ability to detach one’s self from personal tragedy and see it in a humorous light. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

The Controversial Ernest Hemingway

A five page paper showing why Ernest Hemingway has become controversial in the past few years. The paper concludes that Hemingway's lack of sensitivity toward his female characters is the primary factor making his work controversial, but he represented a similar lack of respect in the society of his era. Bibliography lists three sources.

Ernest Hemingway's Own Life Reflected In His Work

This 7 page paper explores the life and work of author Ernest Hemingway, and how his art was a direct result of his life. Hemingway's narrative style, character structure and common themes are also examined.

Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants”

An 11 page analysis of this short story by Ernest Hemingway. The paper shows how Hemingway’s distress over his first wife’s pregnancy and the constraints it put on his life is reflected -- but not entirely resolved -- in this fictional work. Two-page annotated bibliography lists ten sources.

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”: This 5-page essay discusses the significance and symbolism of the leopard and the hyena in this Hemingway classic. Adept in the use of symbolism, Hemingway not only impelled readers to think, but also was able to leave us with a myriad of introspective questions relevant to the melancholia of unfulfilled dreams. Bibliography lists 1 source. SNHemkil.doc

“Hemingway’s novels”

A ten page paper which looks at the works of Ernest Hemingway, and discusses how far the author’s own complex and tortured nature is reflected in the themes of his work and the way in which he draws on his own background and experience to convey the passions and tragedies of human existence to the reader. Bibliography lists nine sources.

Ernest Hemingway / The Man and His Work

In 5 pages, the author discusses Ernest Hemingway, including biographical information, a discussion and analysis of the author's subject matter, what specific traits and literary techniques are evident in the author's work, and what themes are developed in a typical piece by this author. Also included are a discussion and an analysis of 'Hills Life White Elephants' and ' A Clean, Well Lighted Place,' which are specific literary selections typical of the author's work. Bibliography lists 6 sources.