Ernest Hemingway and the Impact of War on the Human Psyche

This 5 page report discusses Ernest Hemingway’s writing that is directly related to his experiences and observations of war and how it has an impact on the psyche of the individual human being. For Hemingway, war serves as a constant in his literary focus and allows for his readers to consider the realities of war in the context in which he wants them to see it rather than in terms of political or even personal points of view. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

“Death in the Afternoon”

A five page paper which looks at Ernest Hemingway’s Death in the Afternoon, and explores the ways in which the author explicates the connection between the Spanish bullfight and ancient sacrificial rites, showing how the corrida takes the form of a tragic drama rather than a sport, and exemplifies the darker elements of the human psyche. Bibliography lists 1 source.

Ernest Hemingway's 'Butterfly & The Tank' / Hemingway in Spain

A 5 page examination of Ernest Hemingway's short story, 'The butterfly and the tank' as a metaphor of Hemingway and the war itself as perceived by his critical contemporaries. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Hills Like White Elephants: An Analysis of Symbolism in Hemingway’s Short Story

A 4 page overview of the symbolism utilized in this short story. Ernest Hemingway is noted for his use of rich symbolism in much of his work. “Hills Like White Elephants” is particularly exemplary in this regard. Hemingway weaves together element of nature and those made by man to present a story which is rich in deep meaning, meaning replete with human emotion, controversy, and moral breaches. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

THE GREAT OUTDOORS IN HEMINGWAY’S WORKS

This paper examines the impact of Ernest Hemingway's "outdoor" life as hunter and fishermen on his classic stories. Throughout the paper, reference is made to Hemingway's ability to pit man against nature. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Ernest Hemingway and “Hills Like White Elephants” -- An Example of a Literary Iceberg Beneath the Surface

This 5 page report discusses Ernest Hemingway’s short stories and the ways in which he presents only the “tip of the iceberg” and the impact of the story lies beneath the surface, left to the imagination of the reader. It seems remarkably clear that Hemingway was determined, in virtually all of his writing, to demonstrate an alternative way of thinking that reflected his own alternative attitudes regarding the status quo. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Ernest Hemingway -- Americans as Nonconformists in “A Man of the World” and “Hills Like White Elephants”

This 5 page report discusses two of Ernest Hemingway’s short stories in terms of how they serve as an example of an American as a rebel rather than a conformist. The writing produced by Ernest Hemingway was in itself an act of rebellion that personifies the unique character of how Americans want or believe they should be perceived -- brash, self-sufficient, able to move beyond what most people would presumably consider personal setbacks, even the ability to detach one’s self from personal tragedy and see it in a humorous light. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms

A 5 page essay that offers a case study on author Ernest Hemingway, focusing on A Farewell to Arms as being exemplary of Hemingway's work. The writer discusses the Hemingway style; the plot, mood, etc. of A Farewell to Arms; and also a short evaluation of the influence of Hemingway's fiction on the writers that came after him. No additional sources cited.

Hemingway and War

A 5 page research paper that examines how Hemingway's own war experiences affected his novels A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and Across the River and into the Trees. The writer argues that the first two books reflect Hemingway's experience in the Spanish Civil War and World War I, but that the WWII novel is derived solely from research and not from Hemingway's personal war experience. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

Ernest Hemingway's "A Farewell To Arms"

10 pages in length. Ernest Hemingway placed himself in all of his works; however, it can readily be argued that none were as personal as A Farewell To Arms. The poignant love story set in the backdrop of World War I is more of an autobiography of the author's own war experience than it is a work of fiction. The writer discusses plot, characterization and underlying themes. Bibliography lists 11 sources.

The End of the Innocence - Hemingway's Life as Mirrored in A Farewell to Arms

A 5 page paper that examines the many parallels that exist between the life of author Ernest Hemingway and his 1929 novel A Farewell to Arms. Discussed are the author's experiences with love and war during his service in World War I and an analysis of how these experiences are directly incorporated into A Farewell to Arms. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”: This 5-page essay discusses the significance and symbolism of the leopard and the hyena in this Hemingway classic. Adept in the use of symbolism, Hemingway not only impelled readers to think, but also was able to leave us with a myriad of introspective questions relevant to the melancholia of unfulfilled dreams. Bibliography lists 1 source. SNHemkil.doc

Ernest Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises": Men And Women

10 pages in length. True to form in depicting a somewhat skewed perception of reality, females are one dimensional in the vast lot of Ernest Hemingway novels. This assertion has been noted by myriad critics, with one going so far as to say that Hemingway feels an obligation to introduce women, though he does not know what to do with them beyond taking them to bed. One novel in particular – "The Sun Also Rises" – brings forth much negativity between Brett and Jake, inasmuch as Brett cannot bring herself to overlook the unexpected impotence Jake experiences after the war. The detrimental impact that has upon Jake as a man and as an individual is enough to make him believe he is worthless as a human being. The domino effect of Brett's shallow perspective appears as a barrier between men and women throughout the novel, effectively dissolving any true intimacy between the sexes and ultimately compelling the men to bond to a much greater degree with their own gender rather than with the women. Bibliography lists 13 sources.

Ernest Hemingway's 'A Farewell To Arms'

A 5 page essay on the transformation of Frederic Henry, the main character in this Ernest Hemingway's novel. The writer traces events in the novel to show how Henry develops from being very immature at the beginning of the story and then ... through the processes of war and his love for Catherine, he matures.

Self Realization in Three War Novels

A 6 page paper which discusses the quest for a deeper sense of self as depicted in three novels: Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell To Arms, Timothy Findley's The Wars, and Joy Kogawa's Obasan. The paper observes that while a major life crisis is not necessary in order to spur on this important personal journey, it is nonetheless true that most of us go through life without doing any particular self analysis until a crisis strikes -- and then self analysis becomes necessary for psychic survival. Bibliography lists three sources.