Gender Tension and Conflict in Selected Short Stories

5 pages. In numerous stories, novels and media there is very evident gender tension and conflict. In examining this occurrence as it appears in short stories, this paper will look at three examples: Hills Like White Elephants by Ernest Hemingway; The Catbird Seat, by James Thurber and The Unicorn in the Garden, also by James Thurber. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Gender Conflict in Thurber and Hemingway

A five page look at the way tension between the sexes is depicted in James Thurber's two stories "The Catbird Seat" and "The Unicorn in the Garden", as well as in Ernest Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants." The paper suggests that Thurber tends to subvert traditional stereotypes about men and women, while Hemingway tends to support them. No additional sources.

Hemingway/Meanings of Masculinity

A 10 page research paper that examine three stories by Ernest Hemingway in regards to his concept of masculinity. The stories are "The End of Something," "The Three-Day Blow," and "Cross-Country Snow." The writer argues against the conventional interpretation of these stories, which sees Hemingway as misogynist. Instead, the writer sees these stories as presenting a "coming of age" for a young man that shows how the protagonist is both attracted to and rebelled by the traditional gender role for men. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms, the Hemingway Hero

A 5 page research paper that examines Hemingway's characterization of Frederic Henry as a "Hemingway hero." The writer argues that Frederic personifies Hemingway's concept of heroism and also relates this to Hemingway's era. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms

A 5 page essay that offers a case study on author Ernest Hemingway, focusing on A Farewell to Arms as being exemplary of Hemingway's work. The writer discusses the Hemingway style; the plot, mood, etc. of A Farewell to Arms; and also a short evaluation of the influence of Hemingway's fiction on the writers that came after him. No additional sources cited.

Hemingway and War

A 5 page research paper that examines how Hemingway's own war experiences affected his novels A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and Across the River and into the Trees. The writer argues that the first two books reflect Hemingway's experience in the Spanish Civil War and World War I, but that the WWII novel is derived solely from research and not from Hemingway's personal war experience. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”: This 5-page essay discusses the significance and symbolism of the leopard and the hyena in this Hemingway classic. Adept in the use of symbolism, Hemingway not only impelled readers to think, but also was able to leave us with a myriad of introspective questions relevant to the melancholia of unfulfilled dreams. Bibliography lists 1 source. SNHemkil.doc

Inner Conflict In Hemingway's Soldier's Home

This 6 page paper posits that Hemingway presents the character of Harold Kreb in Soldier's Home as a man in conflict. He is torn between what he feels is right and what he believes others either expect of him or how they perceive his actions. This internal and external opposition makes for the central theme of the story and is portrayed throughout in a number of different ways. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Illusion Vs. Reality in Ernest Hemingway's "A Farewell to Arms" (Book One)

A 3 page paper which examines the conflict between illusion and reality in the ill-fated wartime love affair between Frederic Henry and Catherine Barkley in Ernest Hemingway's novel, "A Farewell to Arms" (Book One). Bibliography lists 3 sources.

'Comfortable Inaction' and Courage in Hemingway and Tellez

A 4 page paper looking at the conflict between fate and free will, in circumstances calling for moral courage. Stories examined are Hemingway's 'A Clean, Well-Lighted Place,' and Hernando Tellez' 'Just Lather, That's All.' Bibliography lists two sources.

Gender Characterization

To say that gender roles are merely the subjugation of women as 'irrational' would not be true. However, oftentimes women are depicted in literature as irrational and powerless. This 5 page paper explores the characterization of Desiree in Kate Chopin's story of Desiree's Baby; for the grandmother in Flannery O'Connor's A Good Man Is Hard To Find and the woman, Jig, in Hemingway's Hills Like White Elephants in terms of these factors. No additional sources are listed.

Analysis: “The Sun Also Rises”

This 6 page paper analyzes the themes of gender and sports in Hemingway’s novel “The Sun Also Rises.” Bibliography lists 3 sources.

The Feminine Sex: Hemingway's Turning of the Tables in "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber"

In "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber" it is obvious Hemingway was trying to understand the characteristics of being female. This 8 page argumentative notes how Hemingway often put his male characters within his own concepts of the feminine as a means of understanding them. He also put females in male roles, as in this story. The argument looks at binaries and growth out of them. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Hemingway: Differing Treatment Of Men And Women

6 pages in length. Ernest Hemingway was as simple as he was complex. The lucid and uncomplicated images he created with his seemingly elementary style were anything but; in fact, the complexity that resides within his characteristically eloquent prose, which demonstrate a purity and precision like no other, are known only to those who can see beyond their façade. Attention to outer detail and an unquenchable desire to portray his inner pain, Hemingway favored a more simplistic approach to convey his view of women, portraying obvious empathy for his female characters, while his male characters and protagonists appear to be more self absorbed. In viewing the male/female relationships, as well as how men and women are depicted in Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants," "Up in Michigan" and "A Canary for One," the writer discusses how this says a great deal about Hemingway's own perception of women. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Symbolism in Hemingway’s “A Farewell to Arms”

A six page paper showing the importance of symbolic content to the understanding of this 1927 novel by Ernest Hemingway. The paper argues that Hemingway’s use of symbolism underscores his belief that life ultimately has no meaning except for the stoicism created by the hero from inside himself. No additional sources.