Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms, the Hemingway Hero

A 5 page research paper that examines Hemingway's characterization of Frederic Henry as a "Hemingway hero." The writer argues that Frederic personifies Hemingway's concept of heroism and also relates this to Hemingway's era. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Hemingway's Heroes / 'A Farewell To Arms' vs. 'For Whom the Bell Tolls'

An 8 page paper discussing the figure of the Hemingway Code Hero -- the stock figure he invented as the personification of the perfect man -- in both Frederick Henry and Robert Jordan. The paper concludes that even though these characters are very different, in their different aspects as seeker and finder, they are both representations of the Hemingway Code Hero. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Hemingway/"Soldier's Home"

A 3 page research paper/essay that analyzes how Harold Krebs, Hemingway's protagonist in "Soldier's Home," fits the criteria for being an anti-hero. The writer analyzes Hemingway's characterization of Krebs, arguing that he is an anti-hero. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Symbolism in Hemingway’s “A Farewell to Arms”

A six page paper showing the importance of symbolic content to the understanding of this 1927 novel by Ernest Hemingway. The paper argues that Hemingway’s use of symbolism underscores his belief that life ultimately has no meaning except for the stoicism created by the hero from inside himself. No additional sources.

Ernest Hemingway - The Fascinating Hero

An 8 page paper discussing the life and works of Ernest Hemingway. He was a man who was fascinated by stories of heroes and quite likely envisioned himself, in his purest form, as a hero. While Hemingway did not actually perform any truly heroic acts he perhaps wish he had. He was essentially driven to brink of madness, much like many artists, and committed suicide late in his life. He was known to be a depressed individual on occasion and perhaps it was the fact that life as an old man with no more chances at adventure or heroism caused him to immerse himself in a depression that led to his death. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms

A 5 page essay that offers a case study on author Ernest Hemingway, focusing on A Farewell to Arms as being exemplary of Hemingway's work. The writer discusses the Hemingway style; the plot, mood, etc. of A Farewell to Arms; and also a short evaluation of the influence of Hemingway's fiction on the writers that came after him. No additional sources cited.

Hemingway’s Code Hero: Robert in “For Whom the Bell Tolls”

A 5 page paper which examines the Hemingway code hero as it relates to the character of Robert in “For Whom the Bell Tolls.” Bibliography lists 6 sources.

THE BASIS FOR HEMINGWAY’S CODE HERO

This 10 page paper discusses Ernest Hemingway and his development of the 'Code Hero'. Examples from his own life which potentially influenced this evolution are offered as well as examples from Hills Like White Elephants'. Quotes cited from text. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Radical Innocence: Rebel Depiction

This 7 page paper argues that in Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, the protagonist's character includes aspects that deny him the status of hero, but allow him the stature associated with martyrdom. In both Ellison's Invisible Man and Faulkner's Light In August, the social limitations (and brutalities) of race form the basis for the protagonist's journey to an acceptance of self over the acceptance of society. These three stories are analyzed in terms of Ihab Hassan's book, Radical Innocence. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

The Hemingway Code Hero

A 5 page paper which examines the Hemingway code hero in “The Sun also Rises” and “A Farewell to Arms.” Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”: This 5-page essay discusses the significance and symbolism of the leopard and the hyena in this Hemingway classic. Adept in the use of symbolism, Hemingway not only impelled readers to think, but also was able to leave us with a myriad of introspective questions relevant to the melancholia of unfulfilled dreams. Bibliography lists 1 source. SNHemkil.doc

Hemingway and War

A 5 page research paper that examines how Hemingway's own war experiences affected his novels A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and Across the River and into the Trees. The writer argues that the first two books reflect Hemingway's experience in the Spanish Civil War and World War I, but that the WWII novel is derived solely from research and not from Hemingway's personal war experience. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

Hemingway: Differing Treatment Of Men And Women

6 pages in length. Ernest Hemingway was as simple as he was complex. The lucid and uncomplicated images he created with his seemingly elementary style were anything but; in fact, the complexity that resides within his characteristically eloquent prose, which demonstrate a purity and precision like no other, are known only to those who can see beyond their façade. Attention to outer detail and an unquenchable desire to portray his inner pain, Hemingway favored a more simplistic approach to convey his view of women, portraying obvious empathy for his female characters, while his male characters and protagonists appear to be more self absorbed. In viewing the male/female relationships, as well as how men and women are depicted in Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants," "Up in Michigan" and "A Canary for One," the writer discusses how this says a great deal about Hemingway's own perception of women. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Hemingway's "Big Two-Hearted River"

3 pages in length. Considered the most autobiographical of all his works, Hemingway's Big Two-Hearted River reflects upon the writer's never-ending quest to obtain spiritual peace amid an otherwise chaotic world. The absence of organized religion in his life notwithstanding, this spiritual expedition was always fulfilled when Hemingway was surrounded by nature, particularly deep see fishing, two of the primary literary components presented throughout the story. Hemingway's perpetual journey toward the neutralizing elements of 'getting back to nature' is mirrored in the values and actions of Nick Adams, the writer's protagonist whose validity of this search is manifested in such seemingly innocuous realities as settling in to "his home where he had made it" (Hemingway 29). Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Hemingway/Meanings of Masculinity

A 10 page research paper that examine three stories by Ernest Hemingway in regards to his concept of masculinity. The stories are "The End of Something," "The Three-Day Blow," and "Cross-Country Snow." The writer argues against the conventional interpretation of these stories, which sees Hemingway as misogynist. Instead, the writer sees these stories as presenting a "coming of age" for a young man that shows how the protagonist is both attracted to and rebelled by the traditional gender role for men. Bibliography lists 6 sources.