Hemingway + Attitude + Women.

(6 pp) The way that Hemingway shows us the two women involved in "The Sun Also Rises, and "The Short and Happy Life of Francis Macomber," demonstrates that as a general species, he really doesn't like them much. In the term of street slang, both of these women would be called "bitchy." Consequently it is not difficult to determine how the author feels about the idea of "love," from either of these women. That does not say that Hemingway does not have characters that love the women, but rather, these fictional female characters constantly demonstrate that they are not to be trusted, no matter what they may claim. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

The Time of the American Expatriates & The ‘Lost Generation’ in Ernest Hemingway’s “The Sun Also Rises”

An 18 page paper which examines the connection between the American expatriates living in Europe and those dubbed by Gertrude Stein as the ‘lost generation,’ featured in Ernest Hemingway’s 1926 novel, 'The Sun Also Rises.' Specifically considered is what Hemingway’s book meant to the people of the time, how it was a reflection of public attitudes, and provides a character study which explores the personal attitudes and beliefs of narrator Jake Barnes. Bibliography lists 11 sources.

HEMINGWAY AND HIS WOMEN

This 6 page paper deals with the topic of Hemingway and his depiction of women in his stories. Opposing commentary is given for why this may have occurred. Two of Hemingway's short stories are analyzed for this female portrayal: Indian Camp and A Soldier's Home. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Hemingway: Differing Treatment Of Men And Women

6 pages in length. Ernest Hemingway was as simple as he was complex. The lucid and uncomplicated images he created with his seemingly elementary style were anything but; in fact, the complexity that resides within his characteristically eloquent prose, which demonstrate a purity and precision like no other, are known only to those who can see beyond their façade. Attention to outer detail and an unquenchable desire to portray his inner pain, Hemingway favored a more simplistic approach to convey his view of women, portraying obvious empathy for his female characters, while his male characters and protagonists appear to be more self absorbed. In viewing the male/female relationships, as well as how men and women are depicted in Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants," "Up in Michigan" and "A Canary for One," the writer discusses how this says a great deal about Hemingway's own perception of women. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Ernest Hemingway and “Hills Like White Elephants” -- An Example of a Literary Iceberg Beneath the Surface

This 5 page report discusses Ernest Hemingway’s short stories and the ways in which he presents only the “tip of the iceberg” and the impact of the story lies beneath the surface, left to the imagination of the reader. It seems remarkably clear that Hemingway was determined, in virtually all of his writing, to demonstrate an alternative way of thinking that reflected his own alternative attitudes regarding the status quo. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

The Women Of Hemingway's Short Stories

The stories of Ernest Hemingway, particularly The Short Happy Life Of Francis Macomber and The Snows Of Kilimanjaro, are centered on women, drink, money and ambition. This 5 page paper asserts that Hemingway portrays the wife either as a 'bitch' in character and, or, considered to be a bitch by the husband. The woman is also seen as competent and challenging of the male's virility-based ego. Lastly, the women in these stories are seen either by the reader or by the fictional husband as controlling and manipulative. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

Gender Conflict in Thurber and Hemingway

A five page look at the way tension between the sexes is depicted in James Thurber's two stories "The Catbird Seat" and "The Unicorn in the Garden", as well as in Ernest Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants." The paper suggests that Thurber tends to subvert traditional stereotypes about men and women, while Hemingway tends to support them. No additional sources.

Hemingway/Young Women as Objects

A 6 page research paper that examines "Indian Camp" and "Soldier's Home" and argues that Hemingway objectified young women in his fiction. In general, the writer argues that Hemingway did not present females as fully realized characters, but rather focused on the effect that they had on his young male protagonist. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Hemingway/Young Women as Objects

A 6 page research paper that examines "Indian Camp" and "Soldier's Home" and argues that Hemingway objectified young women in his fiction. In general, the writer argues that Hemingway did not present females as fully realized characters, but rather focused on the effect that they had on his young male protagonist. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms

A 5 page essay that offers a case study on author Ernest Hemingway, focusing on A Farewell to Arms as being exemplary of Hemingway's work. The writer discusses the Hemingway style; the plot, mood, etc. of A Farewell to Arms; and also a short evaluation of the influence of Hemingway's fiction on the writers that came after him. No additional sources cited.

Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms, the Hemingway Hero

A 5 page research paper that examines Hemingway's characterization of Frederic Henry as a "Hemingway hero." The writer argues that Frederic personifies Hemingway's concept of heroism and also relates this to Hemingway's era. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Gender Characterization

To say that gender roles are merely the subjugation of women as 'irrational' would not be true. However, oftentimes women are depicted in literature as irrational and powerless. This 5 page paper explores the characterization of Desiree in Kate Chopin's story of Desiree's Baby; for the grandmother in Flannery O'Connor's A Good Man Is Hard To Find and the woman, Jig, in Hemingway's Hills Like White Elephants in terms of these factors. No additional sources are listed.

Hemingway’s Short Stories: The Changing Role of the Female

A 15 page paper comparing and contrasting the role of women in the first two collections of Hemingway’s short stories, In Our Time and Men Without Women. Stories covered include “Soldier’s Home,” “The End of Something,” “Cat in the Rain,” “Hills Like White Elephants,” “Che Ti Dice La Patria?,” and “A Canary For One.” Bibliography lists 9 sources.

Hemingway and War

A 5 page research paper that examines how Hemingway's own war experiences affected his novels A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and Across the River and into the Trees. The writer argues that the first two books reflect Hemingway's experience in the Spanish Civil War and World War I, but that the WWII novel is derived solely from research and not from Hemingway's personal war experience. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”: This 5-page essay discusses the significance and symbolism of the leopard and the hyena in this Hemingway classic. Adept in the use of symbolism, Hemingway not only impelled readers to think, but also was able to leave us with a myriad of introspective questions relevant to the melancholia of unfulfilled dreams. Bibliography lists 1 source. SNHemkil.doc