Hemingway's Fathers And Sons

This 5 page paper argues that the short story, Fathers And Sons, is entered on the theme of rejection, even though the tone is one of wistful longing in concert with anger at not being able to make a connection. The style that Hemingway employs can be described as 'reminiscent narrative'. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

“Hemingway’s Fathers and Sons”

A five page paper which looks at Hemingway’s style, particularly in reference to the Nick Adams series of stories, and the way in which the author uses his observational skills effectively in the portrayal of generations in Fathers and Sons. Bibliography lists 2 sources

Analysis of Indian Camp

This 3 page paper provides an analysis of Ernest Hemingway's short story entitled Indian Camp. The fact that the themes are vital to the plot is demonstrated and the beginning and ending are stressed as elements which serve to magnify them. The father and son relationship between the main characters is explored. No additional sources cited.

Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms

A 5 page essay that offers a case study on author Ernest Hemingway, focusing on A Farewell to Arms as being exemplary of Hemingway's work. The writer discusses the Hemingway style; the plot, mood, etc. of A Farewell to Arms; and also a short evaluation of the influence of Hemingway's fiction on the writers that came after him. No additional sources cited.

Hemingway/A Farewell to Arms, the Hemingway Hero

A 5 page research paper that examines Hemingway's characterization of Frederic Henry as a "Hemingway hero." The writer argues that Frederic personifies Hemingway's concept of heroism and also relates this to Hemingway's era. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

How Authors Portray Individuals vs. Society in Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," Willa Cather's "My Antonia," Richard Wright's "Native Son" & Ernest Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises"

A 5 page paper which examines how the authors portray individuals versus society, emphasizing how society limits individual freedoms and how the characters respond to such controls. Specifically considered are Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," Willa Cather's "My Antonia," Richard Wright's "Native Son" and Ernest Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises." Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Hemingway and War

A 5 page research paper that examines how Hemingway's own war experiences affected his novels A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and Across the River and into the Trees. The writer argues that the first two books reflect Hemingway's experience in the Spanish Civil War and World War I, but that the WWII novel is derived solely from research and not from Hemingway's personal war experience. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”

Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”: This 5-page essay discusses the significance and symbolism of the leopard and the hyena in this Hemingway classic. Adept in the use of symbolism, Hemingway not only impelled readers to think, but also was able to leave us with a myriad of introspective questions relevant to the melancholia of unfulfilled dreams. Bibliography lists 1 source. SNHemkil.doc

The Controversial Ernest Hemingway

A five page paper showing why Ernest Hemingway has become controversial in the past few years. The paper concludes that Hemingway's lack of sensitivity toward his female characters is the primary factor making his work controversial, but he represented a similar lack of respect in the society of his era. Bibliography lists three sources.

Ernest Hemingway and the Impact of War on the Human Psyche

This 5 page report discusses Ernest Hemingway’s writing that is directly related to his experiences and observations of war and how it has an impact on the psyche of the individual human being. For Hemingway, war serves as a constant in his literary focus and allows for his readers to consider the realities of war in the context in which he wants them to see it rather than in terms of political or even personal points of view. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Symbolism in Hemingway’s “A Farewell to Arms”

A six page paper showing the importance of symbolic content to the understanding of this 1927 novel by Ernest Hemingway. The paper argues that Hemingway’s use of symbolism underscores his belief that life ultimately has no meaning except for the stoicism created by the hero from inside himself. No additional sources.

The Feminine Sex: Hemingway's Turning of the Tables in "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber"

In "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber" it is obvious Hemingway was trying to understand the characteristics of being female. This 8 page argumentative notes how Hemingway often put his male characters within his own concepts of the feminine as a means of understanding them. He also put females in male roles, as in this story. The argument looks at binaries and growth out of them. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Ernest Hemingway's Life and Art

A three page biography of Hemingway, showing parallels between his life and his works. Also included are three short original reviews of articles on Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises." Bibliography lists six sources.

Hemingway's "Big Two-Hearted River"

3 pages in length. Considered the most autobiographical of all his works, Hemingway's Big Two-Hearted River reflects upon the writer's never-ending quest to obtain spiritual peace amid an otherwise chaotic world. The absence of organized religion in his life notwithstanding, this spiritual expedition was always fulfilled when Hemingway was surrounded by nature, particularly deep see fishing, two of the primary literary components presented throughout the story. Hemingway's perpetual journey toward the neutralizing elements of 'getting back to nature' is mirrored in the values and actions of Nick Adams, the writer's protagonist whose validity of this search is manifested in such seemingly innocuous realities as settling in to "his home where he had made it" (Hemingway 29). Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Hemingway: Differing Treatment Of Men And Women

6 pages in length. Ernest Hemingway was as simple as he was complex. The lucid and uncomplicated images he created with his seemingly elementary style were anything but; in fact, the complexity that resides within his characteristically eloquent prose, which demonstrate a purity and precision like no other, are known only to those who can see beyond their façade. Attention to outer detail and an unquenchable desire to portray his inner pain, Hemingway favored a more simplistic approach to convey his view of women, portraying obvious empathy for his female characters, while his male characters and protagonists appear to be more self absorbed. In viewing the male/female relationships, as well as how men and women are depicted in Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants," "Up in Michigan" and "A Canary for One," the writer discusses how this says a great deal about Hemingway's own perception of women. Bibliography lists 5 sources.